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‘Electric Dreams’: The Philip K. Dick Stories for Each Episode & How to Read Them


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Philip K. Dick’s Electric Dreams anthology series has debuted on Amazon, executive produced by the late author’s daughter, Isa Dick Hackett. Each episode is based on a short story by Philip K. Dick, but it’s not always so easy to figure out which is which. Some of the episodes take a very loose interpretation of the story and weave together an episode that is completely different. So if you’re wanting to read each story after watching the corresponding episode, be prepared to sometimes embark on a completely different science fiction journey. Here’s a list of the short stories that each episode is based on (in the order that the episodes are presented on Amazon, not on Channel 4.) We will steer clear of major spoilers in this article.

Episode 1, Real Life is based on the short story “Exhibit Piece,” written in 1954. The plot was modified and changed so much for the episode that a future episode could be based on Exhibit Piece and look completely different from this one. The story is also available from Barnes & Noble. It can also be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume III.

Episode 2, Autofac is based on the short story of the same name, Autofac. It’s contained in the short story collection called The Minority Report. It’s also part of the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume IV. Here’s how it originally appeared in 1955.

Episode 3, Human Is is based on the short story Human Is, first published in Startling Stories, Winter 1955. You can get an ebook from Google Play here or on Amazon.  It can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume II.

Episode 4, Crazy Diamond is based on Philip K. Dick’s short story Sales Pitch, from 1954. This story can be found in “The Golden Man” collection of short stories from 1980, or the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume III.

Episode 5, The Hood Maker is based on the short story called The Hood Maker, first published in 1955 from Imagination. It can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume II.

Episode 6, Safe and Sound is based on Philip K. Dick’s short story, Foster, You’re Dead. The 30-page short story can be purchased on Kindle or Paperback. It can also be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume III.

Episode 7, The Father Thing is based on the 1954 short story by Philip K. Dick, The Father-thing. This short story’s title is also the title of a collection of short stories on Amazon published in 1956, just after the publication of his first novel, Solar Lottery. The short story can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume III.

Episode 8, Impossible Planet is based on the short story by the same name, Impossible Planet, from 1953. It can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume II.

Episode 9, The Commuter is based on the 1953 short story by the same name, The Commuter. A paperback version is available on Amazon, but this version has no reviews, so it’s not 100 percent clear this is a trustworthy listing. The story was also published in Amazing Stories in 1966 and August-September 1953. It can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume II.

Episode 10, Kill All Others is based on Philip K. Dick’s short story, The Hanging Stranger. This 30-page short story is available on Amazon in comic form or paperback, and was originally published in the December 1953 issue of Science Fiction Adventures. It can be found in the Collected Short Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume III.

If you see any listings with links to where you can read the books on Amazon, these are affiliate listings that earn advertising fees, but the author and Heavy have no relationship with the products.

Electric Dreams is Amazon’s answer to Netflix’s Black Mirror. Of course, only time will tell if these episodes can meet the high standard left by Netflix’s series, which has already been around for four seasons. Interestingly, Black Mirror began on Channel 4 before it was picked up by Netflix, just like Electric Dreams also began on Channel 4 in the UK. Channel 4 is a British public-service television broadcaster that’s been around since 1982.



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